News Archive

Acupuncture significantly reduces levels of a protein in rats linked to chronic stress, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) have found. They say their animal study may help explain the sense of wellbeing that many people receive from this ancient Chinese therapy.

Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 13:48

Washington University scientists have found a way to lower blood-sugar levels by transplanting insulin-producing cells from embryonic pigs into monkeys, without the need for immune suppression drugs to prevent rejection.



Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 13:29

Stabilizing the cell’s power-generating center protects against Parkinson’s disease (PD) in a rat model, according to a report published online this week in the Journal of Experimental Medicine

Tuesday, December 20, 2011 - 14:23

A new drug candidate may be the first capable of halting the devastating mental decline of Alzheimer's disease, based on the findings of a study published in PLoS ONE.

Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 14:25

Neuroscience researchers from Tufts have demonstrated, for the first time, that the physiological response to stress depends on neurosteroids acting on specific receptors in the brain, and they have been able to block that response in mice.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 13:12

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a jelly-like material and wound treatment method that, in early experiments on skin damaged by severe burns, appeared to regenerate healthy, scar-free tissue.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 13:00

The vaccine, described this week in the early edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a promising new strategy for treating cancers that share the same distinct carbohydrate signature, including ovarian and colorectal cancers.

Tuesday, December 13, 2011 - 11:30

A transparent cornea is essential for vision, which is why the eye has evolved to nourish the cornea without blood vessels. But for millions of people around the world, diseases of the eye or trauma spur the growth of blood vessels and can cause blindness.

Tuesday, December 13, 2011 - 11:16

According to cost analysis for the legislation compiled by the Humane Society of the United States, the majority of cost-savings from GAPA – 76% – would result from ending federal grants for projects involving chimpanzees.  Of the “nearly $30 million saved annually” over $22 million reflects funds committed to support research projects that involve chimpanzees and are funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Thursday, December 8, 2011 - 15:12

Studies of a protein that fruit flies use to sense heat and chemicals may someday provide solutions to human pain and the control of disease-spreading mosquitoes.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011 - 13:31

The spread of breast cancer is responsible for more than 90 percent of breast cancer deaths. Now, the process by which it spreads -- or metastasizes -- has been unraveled by researchers at Johns Hopkins.  Reporting in two papers, the researchers have discovered the switch that enables breast cancer cells to travel to and be received in the lungs.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011 - 13:24

The protein CPEB4 appears to set off legions of genes that spur the growth of pancreatic and brain cancer, and possibly other kinds of tumors, scientists in Spain have discovered.



Tuesday, December 6, 2011 - 15:01

Veterinary researchers in Colorado are trying to come up with a new method of treating a form of canine cancer.

Monday, December 5, 2011 - 14:11

The road from scientific discovery to approved treatment for patients like Wozniak can be lengthy and arduous

Friday, November 4, 2011 - 10:17

A landmark study in mice identifies a biological mechanism that could help explain how tobacco products could act as gateway drugs, increasing a person's future likelihood of abusing cocaine and perhaps other drugs as well, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health. The study is the first to show that nicotine might prime the brain to enhance the behavioral effects of cocaine.

Friday, November 4, 2011 - 09:43

A landmark study in mice identifies a biological mechanism that could help explain how tobacco products could act as gateway drugs, increasing a person's future likelihood of abusing cocaine and perhaps other drugs as well, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health. The study is the first to show that nicotine might prime the brain to enhance the behavioral effects of cocaine.

Friday, November 4, 2011 - 09:40

A University of Michigan Health System laboratory study reveals a key trigger for producing normal red blood cells that could lead to a new treatment for those with sickle cell disease.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 12:39

Can the nerve signaling inhibitor tomosyn help retain long-term memory? A new study by two University of Illinois at Chicago biologists points to the link.

Tuesday, November 1, 2011 - 12:10

A new therapy being studied in non-human primates by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and colleagues is demonstrating promise as a potential tool for combating cardiovascular disease by increasing good cholesterol and lowering triglycerides in the blood.  Supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the preclinical findings appear in this week’s issue of the journal Nature

Monday, October 31, 2011 - 13:20

Salmon, a natural source of omega-3. Professor Breier, who leads an international research team, says omega-3s are especially beneficial for health in ageing because they improve carbohydrate and fat metabolism. His research found a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids helps to burn metabolic fuels (glucose and fat) better, and can regulate energy storage across different tissues.

Monday, October 31, 2011 - 12:49