News Archive

Scientists have identified a gene that keeps our nerve fibers from clogging up. Researchers in Ken Miller’s laboratory at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) found that the unc-16 gene of the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a gatekeeper that restricts flow of cellular organelles from the cell body to the axon, a long, narrow extension that neurons use for signaling. Organelles clogging the axon could interfere with neuronal signaling or cause the axon to degenerate, leading to neurodegenerative disorders. This research, published in the May 2013 Genetics Society of America’s journal GENETICS, adds an unexpected twist to our understanding of trafficking within neurons.

Thursday, May 2, 2013 - 09:53

Jackson Laboratory scientists announced Tuesday that they will use mice as clinical stand-ins, or “avatars,” for human patients with cancerous tumors to help test and create genetically-tailored cancer treatments.

Thursday, May 2, 2013 - 09:52

New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis points to a common species of bacteria as an important contributor to bacterial vaginosis, a condition linked to preterm birth and increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 15:28

Study shows grapes reduced inflammation and fat storage, improved antioxidant defense

Tuesday, April 23, 2013 - 15:34

Neuroscientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have taken a major step in their efforts to help people with memory loss tied to brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Friday, April 19, 2013 - 13:50

When scientists began sequencing the zebrafish genome in 2001, the model organism was a favourite of biologists studying early development of the brain and other organs. Few others found much use for the small, stripy fish with see-through embryos. More than a decade later, with its genome finally unveiled today, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become the go-to animal for researchers studying many human diseases — as well as those investigating new treatments.

Thursday, April 18, 2013 - 15:15

US scientists have designed a super-grip plaster covered with microscopic needles to heal surgical wounds.

The "bed-of-needles" patch, inspired by a parasitic worm that lives in the guts of fish and clings on using its cactus-like spikes, fixes skin grafts firmly in place without the need for staples.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013 - 14:06

When she was head of a cardiac imaging center at UCLA, Barbara Natterson-Horowitz was asked one day to perform echocardiography on the failing heart of the Los Angeles Zoo’s python. As the cardiologist gazed on an image of the snake’s one-ventricle heart, it occurred to her that snakes might offer clues for treating children born without a septum between their ventricles.

At that moment, she began to see a connection between the health of humans and that of what she would call our nonhuman brethren.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 - 15:20

The oil, which has been long used by Aborigines to treat skin wounds, was discovered to be capable of speeding the repair of the intestines and treating a variety of common bowel diseases.

Researchers at Adelaide University found the oil is an effective anti-inflammatory and can accelerate the repair of the bowels by stimulating growth of intestinal "crypts", which assist with absorbing food.

Up to 60 per cent of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy receive painful intestinal ulcers but there are currently "no effective treatment options", the researchers said.

Monday, April 15, 2013 - 14:06

In a new study by scientists at King's College London and the University of Arizona (UA) published in Science reveals the deep similarities in how the brain regulates behaviour in arthropods (such as flies and crabs) and vertebrates (such as fish, mice and humans). The findings shed new light on the evolution of the brain and behaviour and may aid understanding of disease mechanisms underlying mental health problems.

A new study by scientists at King's College London and the University of Arizona (UA) published in Science reveals the deep similarities in how the brain regulates behaviour in arthropods (such as flies and crabs) and vertebrates (such as fish, mice and humans). The findings shed new light on the evolution of the brain and behaviour and may aid understanding of disease mechanisms underlying mental health problems.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-strikingly-similar-brains-aid-mental.html#jCp
A new study by scientists at King's College London and the University of Arizona (UA) published in Science reveals the deep similarities in how the brain regulates behaviour in arthropods (such as flies and crabs) and vertebrates (such as fish, mice and humans). The findings shed new light on the evolution of the brain and behaviour and may aid understanding of disease mechanisms underlying mental health problems.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-strikingly-similar-brains-aid-mental.html#jCp

Friday, April 12, 2013 - 13:52

Researchers have discovered that using two kinds of therapy in tandem may be a knockout combo against inherited disorders that cause blindness. While their study focused on man’s best friend, the treatment could help restore vision in people, too.

Thursday, April 11, 2013 - 14:26

A new genetically engineered lab rat that has the full array of brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease supports the idea that increases in a molecule called beta-amyloid in the brain causes the disease, according to a study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience.  The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 12:01

The treatment Perry's dogs received was developed by MediVet America of Lexington, Ky., one of several companies that sell equipment and training to veterinary clinics around the world. MediVet has more than a thousand clinics. Participating vets have performed more than 10,000 stem cell procedures – about 7,000 of them in the past 12 months.

Monday, April 8, 2013 - 16:18

The need to distinguish between normal cells and tumor cells is a feature that has been long sought for most types of cancer drugs. Tumor antigens, unique proteins on the surface of a tumor, are potential targets for a normal immune response against cancer. Identifying which antigens a patient's tumor cells express is the cornerstone of designing cancer therapy for that individual. But some of these tumor antigens are also expressed on normal cells, inching personalized therapy back to the original problem.

Monday, April 8, 2013 - 11:00

JUST add water and sperm – any romance should be provided separately. In future, women who want to safeguard their fertility may be able to store their eggs at home as a powder. To revive them for an attempt at having a baby, all they would need to do is empty the sachet, add water, fertilise with sperm and implant the embryo. The technique was demonstrated with cow eggs last month at Cryo, a conference on cold-preservation techniques for eggs, sperm and embryos held in Berlin, Germany.

Friday, April 5, 2013 - 09:29

A team of UC Davis scientists has found that a product resulting from a metabolized omega-3 fatty acid helps combat cancer by cutting off the supply of oxygen and nutrients that fuel tumor growth and spread of the disease.

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 - 10:06

Johns Hopkins scientists say they have evidence from animal studies that a type of central nervous system cell other than motor neurons plays a fundamental role in the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal degenerative disease. The discovery holds promise, they say, for identifying new targets for interrupting the disease’s progress.

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - 16:26

Usually, science starts in the lab and then moves to patients. Gastric bypass surgery has taken the opposite path. Originally offered as a radical treatment for severe obesity, the surgery's effects on the digestive system and metabolism have turned out to be far more mysterious and fascinating than anyone expected. Now, a new study probes another of the surgery's effects: its impact on microbes in the gut and how changing these microscopic communities might drive weight loss.

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - 14:48

Researchers are finding new drugs for chronic pain and autoimmune diseases by modifying animal venom-derived molecules that target the nervous and immune systems.

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 14:55

Study reveals ‘evolutionary glitch’ as possible cause of common childhood ear infections. Researchers at King’s College London have uncovered how the human ear is formed, giving clues as to why children are susceptible to infections such as glue ear.

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 15:17