News Archive

We don't pay all that much attention to animal tests of experimental treatments. So many approaches that look good early on never make it in the real world. But, let's face it, when it comes to the deadly Ebola and Marburg viruses, you  don't want to be testing the effectiveness of treatments in people for viruses that kill them 80 percent or more of the time.

Monday, August 30, 2010 - 09:58

Kissing a frog won't turn it into a prince — except in fairy tales — but frogs may be hopping toward a real-world transformation into princely allies in humanity's battle with antibiotic-resistant infections that threaten millions of people worldwide.

Friday, August 27, 2010 - 11:25

An international study led by biologists and neuroscientists from the University of Pennsylvania has identified a new genetic risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Friday, August 27, 2010 - 11:13

A team of University of Michigan scientists has found that suppressing a newly discovered gene lengthens the lifespan of roundworms.

Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 11:45

Immature human nerve cells grew in the spines of injured mice and helped them walk a little better, researchers said on Wednesday in a study they said shows it may be possible to treat patients weeks or months after their accidents.

Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 10:48

In one of only two studies of its kind, a study from researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts demonstrates that non-viral gene therapy can delay the onset of some forms of eye disease and preserve vision.

Tuesday, August 17, 2010 - 08:32

Hope that neural stem cells (NSCs) might be of benefit to individuals with severe spinal cord injury has now been provided by the work of a team of researchers, led by Kinichi Nakashima, at Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Japan, in a mouse model of this devastating condition.

Tuesday, August 17, 2010 - 08:28

Researchers for the first time have induced robust regeneration of nerve connections that control voluntary movement after spinal cord injury, showing the potential for new therapeutic approaches to paralysis and other motor function impairments.

Monday, August 9, 2010 - 08:27

Researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health have for the first time activated mouse egg cells at the earliest stage of their development and brought them to maturity. In a related experiment, the researchers replicated the finding by also bringing human eggs to maturity in the laboratory.

Wednesday, August 4, 2010 - 12:49

Researchers from the University of Sydney's Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease Laboratory have achieved a major breakthrough by finding the causes of Alzheimer's disease at a cellular level and thereby identifying a potential therapy as a result.

Wednesday, August 4, 2010 - 09:40

Multiple myeloma is one of the most common blood cancers, and at present considered to be incurable. In a new study from Uppsala University, researchers now present a conceptually new model for the development and progression of multiple myeloma.

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 10:01

A medical research team led by University of Miami doctors injected stem cells into the hearts of pigs that had been damaged by heart attacks. Within two months, the doctors said, the stem cells made the pigs' hearts good as new.

Friday, July 30, 2010 - 10:31

A chemical compound that boosts the action of a molecule normally produced in the brain may provide the starting point for a new line of therapies for the treatment of epileptic seizures, according to a new study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute.

Thursday, July 29, 2010 - 13:55

The experiment demonstrated the feasibility of an approach to growing dissimilar tissues, such as cartilage and bone, derived entirely from the host’s own cells. Results of the study are in the July 29 issue of The Lancet.

Thursday, July 29, 2010 - 08:43

Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a molecular pathway responsible for the death of key nerve cells whose loss causes Parkinson’s disease. This discovery not only may explain how a genetic mutation linked to Parkinson’s causes the cells’ death, but could also open the door to new therapeutic approaches for the malady.

Wednesday, July 28, 2010 - 13:09

Scientists have developed a new version of a medication, first isolated from the saliva of sea snails, that could be taken in pill form to relieve the most severe forms of pain as effectively as morphine but without risking addiction.

Wednesday, July 28, 2010 - 13:00

A combination of nutrients called NT-020 promoted adult neural stem cell proliferation in aged rats and boosted their memory performance, reported University of South Florida researchers studying natural therapeutic approaches to promoting the health of neurons in the aging brain. Researchers from the USF Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair tested two groups of aged laboratory rats; one group received NT-020 and another, the control group, did not. In the NT-020 group, the process by which neurons are generated -- called neurogenesis -- increased.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010 - 11:02

If mice are administered an antibiotic for three days and are simultaneously infected with malaria, no parasites appear in the blood and life-threatening disease is averted. In addition, the animals treated in this manner also develop robust, long-term immunity against subsequent infections.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010 - 10:51

In the initial stages of sleep, energy levels increase dramatically in brain regions found to be active during waking hours, according to new research in the June 30 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. These results suggest that a surge of cellular energy may replenish brain processes needed to function normally while awake.

Tuesday, July 6, 2010 - 10:37

Those looking for a new treatment for a range of inflammatory diseases like arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and lupus may need to look no further than a drug already available for treating cancer.

Thursday, July 1, 2010 - 11:40