News Archive

The human airway is a pretty inhospitable place for microbes. There are numerous immune defense mechanisms poised to kill or remove inhaled bacteria before they can cause problems. But cystic fibrosis disrupts these defenses, leaving patients particularly susceptible to airway infection, which is the major cause of disease and death in cystic fibrosis. Using a unique animal model of cystic fibrosis, pigs, a team of scientists from the University of Iowa has discovered a difference between healthy airways and airways affected by cystic fibrosis that leads to reduced bacterial killing in cystic fibrosis airways.

Thursday, July 5, 2012 - 15:13

University of British Columbia scientists, in collaboration with an industry partner, have successfully reversed diabetes in mice using stem cells, paving the way for a breakthrough treatment for a disease that affects nearly one in four Canadians.

Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - 16:36

Scientists say they have assembled more completely the string of genetic letters that could control how well parrots learn to imitate their owners and other sounds.

Tuesday, July 3, 2012 - 15:56

Scientists at Arizona State University have discovered that honey bees may teach us about basic connections between taste perception and metabolic disorders in humans.

Monday, July 2, 2012 - 15:10

Mayo Clinic researchers have successfully used smaller, folded DNA molecules to stimulate regeneration and repair of nerve coatings in mice that mimic multiple sclerosis (MS).

Friday, June 29, 2012 - 16:29

UCLA researchers have discovered that a diet enriched with a popular omega-3 fatty acid and an ingredient in curry spice helps to preserve walking ability in rats that have experienced damage to their spinal cords.

Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 16:30

Researchers at Oregon State University have for the first time traced the actions of a known carcinogen in cooked meat to its complex biological effects on microRNA and cancer stem cells.

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - 16:02

As the world fights obesity at the human level, scientists at the University of Michigan and their colleagues have made a surprising finding at the microscopic level that could help fuel that fight.Their work, using mice, helps explain why fat-storing cells get fatter, and burn fat slower, as obesity sets in. If their findings from mice can be shown to apply to humans, they may provide a new target for obesity-fighting drugs.

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 - 16:48

A Chesterton family’s beloved dog diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor has a new "leash" on life thanks to a Purdue University veterinary neurosurgeon and a research study by the University of Minnesota.

Monday, June 25, 2012 - 16:08

The Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) has a breeding program of its own and also gets its animals from other breeding programs around the country.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 16:14

Fish cannot display symptoms of autism, schizophrenia or other human brain disorders. However, a team of MIT biologists has shown that zebrafish can be a useful tool for studying the genes that contribute to such disorders.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 14:23

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found new clues to why some urinary tract infections recur persistently after multiple rounds of treatment.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012 - 16:00

What started as a study observing how contaminants in the Kalamazoo River affect frogs is evolving into Western Michigan University becoming a national leader in finding a cure for a rare human disease.

Monday, June 18, 2012 - 16:19

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered one of the most important cellular mechanisms driving the growth and progression of meningioma, the most common form of brain and spinal cord tumor. A report on the discovery, published in the journal Molecular Cancer Research, could lead the way to the discovery of better drugs to attack these crippling tumors, the scientists say.

Friday, June 15, 2012 - 15:53

Mosquitoes bred to be unable to infect people with the malaria parasite are an attractive approach to helping curb one of the world’s most pressing public health issues, according to UC Irvine scientists.

Thursday, June 14, 2012 - 15:49

If you want to make the worm turn, try using magnets. By implanting nanoparticles in nerve cells in a nematode's head, Arnd Pralle and his team from the State University of New York in Buffalo can make a wriggling worm alter its course when exposed to a magnetic field.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 - 16:21

What can a twentysomething naked mole-rat tell us about fighting pain, cancer, and aging?

Monday, June 11, 2012 - 11:18

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have identified a brain receptor that appears to play a central role in regulating appetite. The findings, published today in the online edition of Cell, could lead to new drugs for preventing or treating obesity.

Friday, June 8, 2012 - 16:07

A team of Idaho State University researchers have discovered that fish show autism-like gene expression after exposure to water containing psychoactive pharmaceuticals. The results may suggest an environmental trigger for autism, although this finding may only apply to genetically predisposed individuals.

Thursday, June 7, 2012 - 15:42

The brain receives information from the ear in a surprisingly orderly fashion, according to a University at Buffalo study scheduled to appear June 6 in the Journal of Neuroscience. The research focuses on a section of the brain called the cochlear nucleus, the first way-station in the brain for information coming from the ear. In particular, the study examined tiny biological structures called synapses that transmit signals from the auditory nerve to the cochlear nucleus.

Wednesday, June 6, 2012 - 15:53