News Archive

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have shown for the first time in an animal model that vitamin C actively protects against osteoporosis, a disease affecting large numbers of elderly women and men in which bones become brittle and can fracture.

Thursday, October 11, 2012 - 12:51

Recent studies have linked caffeine consumption to a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease, and a new University of Illinois study may be able to explain how this happens.  “We have discovered a novel signal that activates the brain-based inflammation associated with neurodegenerative diseases, and caffeine appears to block its activity. This discovery may eventually lead to drugs that could reverse or inhibit mild cognitive impairment,” said Gregory Freund, a professor in the U of I’s College of Medicine and a member of the U of I’s Division of Nutritional Sciences.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 - 14:12

Two Americans shared this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for deciphering the communication system that the human body uses to sense the outside world and send messages to cells — for example, speeding the heart when danger approaches. The understanding is aiding the development of new drugs.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 - 12:00

John B. Gurdon of the Gurdon Institute in Cambridge and Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University in Japan have won the 2012 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for finding that cells of an adult organism—once thought be terminally locked into their developed state—can start anew. The discoveries, awarded the prize this morning (October 8) by The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, have ignited research in areas ranging from cloning to cancer treatment.

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 11:49

Researchers claim to have successfully transformed stem cells into viable mouse oocytes that produced healthy, fertile pups.

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 08:48

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai’s Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute have found that a blood vessel-building gene boosts the ability of human bone marrow stem cells to sustain pancreatic recovery in a laboratory mouse model of insulin-dependent diabetes.

Wednesday, October 3, 2012 - 13:52

Using animal models, researchers at the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have found a new genetic mutation responsible for deafness and hearing loss associated with Usher syndrome type 1.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012 - 14:29

Animal models contribute significantly to our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathologies. However, few models predictably translate preclinical findings into what will happen in humans.

Investigational drugs are able to cure mice from many diseases, but continue to fail in clinical trials. This fact is largely attributed to poor model designs that do not sufficiently reflect the pathophysiology of disease in humans. In addition, tremendous diversity of human genetic background, co-medications, dosing, timing of treatment, and many other factors greatly influence the treatment outcome.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012 - 11:51

An international team of scientists, led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, have discovered an entirely new approach to the treatment of type II diabetes. The therapy involves the blockade of signalling by a protein known as VEGF-B and this prevents fat from accumulating in the "wrong" places, such as in muscles and in the heart. As a result the cells within these tissues are once again able to respond to insulin.  In experiments on mice and rats, the scientists have managed to both prevent the development of type II diabetes and reverse the progression of established disease.

Monday, October 1, 2012 - 14:34

Studying leukemia in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have reduced a life-threatening complication of stem cell transplants, the only curative treatment when leukemia returns.

Friday, September 28, 2012 - 10:38

A small African mammal with an unusual ability to regrow damaged tissues could inspire new research in regenerative medicine, a University of Florida study finds.

Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 15:26

In what could be the ultimate in personalized medicine, animals bearing your disease, or part of your anatomy, can serve as your personal guinea pig, so to speak. Some researchers call them avatars, like the virtual characters in movies and online games.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 12:48

A Kansas State University professor's research improving post-surgery pain treatment and osteoarthritis therapy in dogs may help develop better ways to treat humans for various medical conditions.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 09:05

EGFR inhibitors used to fight cancer show surprising efficacy in fly, mouse models of beta amyloid-associated memory loss.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 14:03

Long stretches of DNA once considered inert dark matter appear to be uniquely active in a part of the brain known to control the body’s 24-hour cycle, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

Working with material from rat brains, the researchers found some expanses of DNA contained the information that generate biologically active molecules. The levels of these molecules rose and fell, in synchrony with 24-hour cycles of light and darkness. Activity of some of the molecules peaked at night and diminished during the day, while the remainder peaked during the day and diminished during the night.

Friday, September 21, 2012 - 13:18

By integrating themselves into the germ line of their host, retroviruses change the genetic code of their host. The only known case where this process can be currently observed is in Koalas. As an international team of scientists from Australia, Europe and North America just found out, this process may take longer than expected, with the virus continuing to have a serious pathological impact on the host which may go on for centuries.

Friday, September 21, 2012 - 13:14

Genetically engineered mouse models appear to be the most accurate preclinical predictor of how cancer-fighting drugs are delivered to melanoma patients, a new study has found.

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 14:14

Venomous reptiles may provide a good source for new drugs for human diseases, researchers in Liverpool say.

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - 15:01

The absence of a specific type of neuron in the brain can lead to obesity and diabetes in mice report researchers in The EMBO Journal. The outcome, however, depends on the type of diet that the animals are fed.

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - 14:15

A Univ. of Iowa study suggests there are two root causes of a type of diabetes associated with cystic fibrosis (CF). The findings, made possible using ferrets, which already have sparked a clinical trial, may guide development of new treatments or even help prevent diabetes in patients with CF.

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - 14:09