News Archive

In the months after a roadside bomb in Afghanistan blew off part of his left thigh, Sgt. Ron Strang wondered if he would ever be able to walk normally again. But that was two years ago. Now he walks easily, can run on a treadmill and is thinking of a post-military career as a police officer. “If you know me, or know to look for it, you can see a slight limp,” he said. “But everybody else, they go, ‘I would never have guessed.’ ” There is something else they would never have guessed: Sergeant Strang has grown new muscle thanks to a thin sheet of material from a pig.

Tuesday, September 18, 2012 - 13:28

A new wave of experimental vaccines, tested in mice, is the medical community’s latest hope against a powerful staph infection that kills more people in the U.S. than skin cancer and costs as much as $8 billion a year to treat.

Monday, September 17, 2012 - 15:14

Scientists have designed a brain implant that sharpened decision making and restored lost mental capacity in monkeys, providing the first demonstration in primates of the sort of brain prosthesis that could eventually help people with damage from dementia, strokes or other brain injuries.

Friday, September 14, 2012 - 14:29

New research reveals that fruit flies and mammals may share a surprising evolutionary link in how they control body temperature through circadian rhythm, unlocking new ways to study the insects as models of human development and disease.

Friday, September 14, 2012 - 10:26

Researchers have restored the ability to hear in deaf gerbils using implanted human stem cells, achieving what they call a first step in potentially overcoming some causes of hearing loss in people.

Thursday, September 13, 2012 - 11:38

Researchers from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center demonstrate, in animals, that maternal exposure to a high-fat diet or excess estrogen during pregnancy can increase breast cancer risk in multiple generations of female offspring — daughters, granddaughters and even great-granddaughters.

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 - 15:34

Doctors at the hospital’s Vascular Birthmark Institute were enticed by the chance to study anomalies of the arteries and veins that are rare in humans but common in dogs. And the traffic between human and animal hospitals flows in the other direction, too: Late last month, veterinarians from the Animal Medical Center began meeting with their counterparts at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center to set up trials of a noninvasive device for removing tumors of the urinary tract with electrical impulses. Exchanges of this sort are becoming increasingly common. Once a narrow trail traveled by a few hardy pioneers, the road connecting veterinary colleges and human medical institutions has become a busy thoroughfare over the last five years or so, with a steady flow of researchers representing a wide variety of medical disciplines on both sides.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 13:28

A novel human liver-chimeric mouse model developed at Oregon Health & Science University and Yecuris Corporation has made possible a research breakthrough at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute that will greatly accelerate studies of the most lethal forms of human malaria.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 10:05

The injection of a tiny capsule containing heat-generating cells into the abdomens of mice led those animals to burn abdominal fat and initially lose about 20 percent of belly fat after 80 days of treatment.

Monday, September 10, 2012 - 16:05

Sleep disruptions may be among the earliest indicators of Alzheimer’s disease, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report Sept. 5 in Science Translational Medicine. Working in a mouse model, the researchers found that when the first signs of Alzheimer’s plaques appear in the brain, the normal sleep-wake cycle is significantly disrupted.

Friday, September 7, 2012 - 14:57

A vaginal ring that emits an HIV- fighting drug protected monkeys from getting a version of the AIDS-causing virus, according to a study that suggests the same approach may help women whose partners won’t wear condoms.

Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 15:21

Not only have great strides been made in human genetics but also in animal genetics. This is important because such genetic information is not only helpful to the animal, but it frequently can also be applied to humans, remarked Dr. Murray Feingold.

Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 15:19

Scientists have restored the sense of smell in mice through gene therapy for the first time -- a hopeful sign for people who can’t smell anything from birth or lose it due to disease.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 10:26

Researchers found that the human monoclonal antibody targeting the virus protected chimpanzees from HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner in a study conducted at Texas Biomed's Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio. Chimpanzees are the only species other than humans that can be infected by the hepatitis C virus and therefore the results from this study were critical in the development of the monoclonal antibody.

Friday, August 31, 2012 - 09:27

Research at Imperial College London examining influenza transmission in ferrets suggests that the virus can be passed on before the appearance of symptoms. If the finding applies to humans, it means that people pass on flu to others before they know they’re infected, making it very difficult to contain epidemics.

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - 15:40

The latest news from a long-term study of calorie restriction in rhesus macaques shows better health, but no boost in lifespan, in monkeys who eat less.

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - 10:58

A drug originally developed to stop cancerous tumors may hold the potential to prevent abnormal brain cell growth and learning disabilities in some children, if they can be diagnosed early enough, a new animal study suggests.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - 14:32

Leuven scientists (VIB/KU Leuven) are using zebrafish as a model in their search for genes that play a role in the mechanism of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As a result, they have identified a molecule that could be the target for a future ALS treatment.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - 10:32

Rat studies show that cognitive control, an ability eroded in disorders such as schizophrenia, could be protected with brain training.

Friday, August 24, 2012 - 13:39

How do stem cells preserve their ability to become any type of cell in the body? And how do they “decide” to give up that magical state and start specializing? If researchers could answer these questions, our ability to harness stem cells to treat disease could explode.  University of Michigan Medical School researcher Yali Dou and her team have discovered the crucial role of a protein called Mof in preserving the "stem-ness" of stem cells, and priming them to become specialized cells in mice.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 15:14